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Posts Tagged ‘ocr b’

Hengistbury Head fun

Well here we go! It’s nearly time for me to leave you Year 11, and I just know that you will do so well in the summer. It’s been a total pleasure teaching you, and I will really miss you. I can’t wait to hear how brilliantly you all do on results day and will be keeping an eye on you from Kent, and sending the odd email to check you are still being fab 🙂

So, here are your revision materials! Keep yourself organised. Nibble away at the revision. Have a clear plan and stick to it. Take breaks, eat well, sleep, get fresh air. Try not to just sit and cram as you will stress. If you feel nothing is going in, then take a minute to step away, breathe in and out or sing a song or get some air in the garden then crack back on.

Remember the two exams are very different structure, and test different skills. Ensure you revise the right bits! There are loads of past papers in the OneDrive documents http://1drv.ms/1MMaJD0 here.

SDME Exam 24th May 2016 – Rivers & Coasts. It is most likely to focus on flooding and flood management, or coastal erosion and coastal management. But it could be both, so learn both.

Key Themes 8th June 2016 – Natural hazards, Population and Settlement, Economic Development. Case study focus.

So be good, be happy, be successful, and be the awesome geographers I know you are. Miss D 🙂

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Year 11 Revision update

Below is an update for your Revision Pack for 2015. Well done for how you have coped with this year. I know it’s been tough and a lot to cover.

Don’t forget there are two exams.

1) SDME (Sustainable Decision Making Exercise) exam on 19th May – topic is Economic Development which means anything to do with aid, industry, location of industry and the impacts of these on the environment. This could include how companies such as Coca Cola impact the area, or how tourism changes and impacts a place over time, or how aid is given to help places. It is the exam that has a resource pack and you have to be able to analyse the resources, quote from them, and make a decision about how best to manage a situation (e.g. how to manage the impacts of tourism, how to give aid sustainably, how to manage industrial location and their impacts, etc.)

2) Key Themes exam on 3rd June is on the remaining three units: Rivers & Coasts, Population & Settlement, Tectonic & Climatic Hazards. This is the exam where you absolutely MUST know your case studies and be able to write in developed paragraphs including specific fact.

Revision workshops are available every Monday or Tuesday after school in G1, plus Thursday lunch times to drop in and ask for help individually. Next half term, every Saturday I will be available from 10-2 in G1 for help – and will provide cake and goodies. Then in May half term I will offer revision days on the Monday and Tuesday from 10-2 and will provide pizza / treats. You don’t have to come for the whole time, just drop in for an hour. Practise some exam Qs, get me to check over a case study. Whatever. We are here to help but YOU need to turn up and come knowing what you need to revise!

So here is the revision pack. Enjoy!

Ms D 🙂

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Just a reminder that there are resources on this blog to help with your Controlled Assessment. First up is perfecting the introduction or ‘Setting the Scene’.

This is the first impression you give to myself and the examiner about how good a geographer you are. It is important to write in a formal future tense – of what you are going to do. You are not answering the question here, you are introducing the project and what will be done. It is essential that you include links to theory in here, e.g. longshore drift, how geology can influence a coast, what geomorphology is, what geology means, what distinctive means, how waves work and the difference between destructive and constructive waves, why coastal management is used and how it can influence. You are basically saying to the examiner ‘look, I don’t know the answers yet but this is what I already think based on my knowledge of coasts already’. It is what sets you apart from non-geographers. Anyone can say ‘this is a beach, it has different types of material, it has a cliff’ – the GCSE Genius Geographer (all of you!) will say ‘I expect to see a beach that has been formed by constructive waves and longshore drift, this is when…………….’ .

The powerpoint from the lesson is here:

And from the first lesson:

Don’t forget you can email me at any point, and attend workshop on Mondays for help.

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Year 11 – this is the booklet for your controlled assessment fieldwork to Hengistbury Head. Remember the booklet is for the fieldwork day and is to be completed in detail for you to refer back to when you complete the rest of the project.

Bear in mind the overall title at all times: To what extent is geology the main influence on the distinctive coastal landforms of Hengistbury Head and Mudeford Spit?

This needs to be broken down.

Firstly, you need to identify what the distinctive (unique, unusual) landforms are first, e.g. the spit is distinctive compared to other areas within a 50mile radius, the headland is distinctive because of its history, the marsh is distinctive because it is a SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) and has a protected species.

Then consider what ALL the possible influences are on the landforms: geology, human influence (coastal management and the nature reserves), geomorphic processes (erosion, deposition, transportation). Try to weigh up and predict which factor you think will be most influential on changing the landforms.

You can argue the case that geology IS the main influence, or is NOT. So long as you can PROVE IT by collecting data / evidence on the trip and in your research. Your evidence must be analysed and explored using theory (e.g. link longshore drift to the type of geology, link the creation of the salt marsh to the presence of groynes, etc.).

Remember: fact, theory, evidence. Analyse, explain, suggest.

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Year 10 – your controlled assessment resources are on here to refer to. I’ll add more in as we get through.

Remember the topic: “To what extent is geology the main influence on the distinctive coastal landforms of Hengistbury Head?”

You can argue that geology is or is not the main influence – ‘to what extent’ means ‘how much’, so you need to evaluate the influence of geology.

First you need to define ‘distinctive’. Then you need to decide what landforms are distinctive at Hengistbury Head. then you can evaluate what has had an influence on these landforms.

Consider: What coastal landforms are there? Are they distinctive? How does geology have an impact? What other influences are there? What coastal processes are involved? How do they influence the landforms? What is the impact of people? Is there evidence of coastal management and how does this effect the landforms?

 

 

 

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Below are files useful for Year 11 for your revision. 

There are example questions to practise, some model answers (that are in more detail than you would need to know – remember it is just 3 fully developed points) and the revision pack itself. Don’t forget to work through your checklists and keep on ploughing. 

And remember the SDME is different – based on resource analysis and the essay.

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Here are the resources for ageing populations. Remember to link to the population pyramids and demographic transition model (DTM). e.g. an ageing population is more likely in stage 5 of the DTM due to an increase in life expectancy due to improved healthcare and income allowing for healthier elderly populations.

Consider the impact of an ageing population on DEPENDENCY and how this effects the economy of a country. Then consider how this can be managed.

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